The cannabinoids from the marijuana plant help to increase the body’s function and utilization of this component. The ECS is directly responsible for assisting in certain body processes, including sleep regulation, pain control and immune system responses. With a supplemented increase in cannabinoids by consuming CBD, the body is encouraged to administer its already present endocannabinoids more efficiently, in turn greater regulating its sleep patterns, immune system and pain. This is the reason why so many have found grave success in treating their pain with the all-natural and non-psychoactive cannabidiol.
Multiple sclerosis (MS). There is inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of cannabidiol for symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Some early research suggests that using a cannabidiol spray under the tongue might improve pain and muscle tightness in people with MS. However, it does not appear to improve muscle spasms, tiredness, bladder control, the ability to move around, or well-being and quality of life.
In 1988, the first cannabinoid receptor was identified (CB1) (Howlett et al 1988) and in 1993, a second was described (CB2) (Munro et al 1993). Both are 7-domain G-protein coupled receptors affecting cyclic-AMP, but CB1 is more pervasive throughout the body, with particular predilection to nociceptive areas of the central nervous system and spinal cord (Herkenham et al 1990; Hohmann et al 1999), as well as the peripheral nervous system (Fox et al 2001; Dogrul et al 2003) wherein synergy of activity between peripheral and central cannabinoid receptor function has been demonstrated (Dogrul et al 2003). CB2, while commonly reported as confined to lymphoid and immune tissues, is also proving to be an important mediator for suppressing both pain and inflammatory processes (Mackie 2006). Following the description of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands for these were discovered: anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide, AEA) in 1992 in porcine brain (Devane et al 1992), and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) in 1995 in canine gut tissue (Mechoulam et al 1995) (Figure 1). These endocannabinoids both act as retrograde messengers on G-protein coupled receptors, are synthesized on demand, and are especially active on glutamatergic and GABA-ergic synapses. Together, the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (“endocannabinoids”) and metabolizing enzymes comprise the endocannabinoid system (ECS) (Di Marzo et al 1998), whose functions have been prosaically termed to be “relax, eat, sleep, forget and protect” (p. 528). The endocannabinoid system parallels and interacts at many points with the other major endogenous pain control systems: endorphin/enkephalin, vanilloid/transient receptor potential (TRPV), and inflammatory. Interestingly, our first knowledge of each pain system has derived from investigation of natural origin analgesic plants, respectively: cannabis (Cannabis sativa, C. indica) (THC, CBD and others), opium poppy (Papaver somniferun) (morphine, codeine), chile peppers (eg, Capsicum annuum, C. frutescens, C. chinense) (capsaicin) and willow bark (Salix spp.) (salicylic acid, leading to acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin). Interestingly, THC along with AEA and 2-AG, are all partial agonists at the CB1 receptor. Notably, no endocannabinoid has ever been administered to humans, possibly due to issues of patentability and lack of commercial feasibility (Raphael Mechoulam, pers comm 2007). For an excellent comprehensive review of the endocannabinoid system, see Pacher et al (2006), while Walker and Huang have provided a key review of antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids in models of acute and persistent pain (Walker and Huang 2002).
Since 1929, Standard Process has been the visionary leader in whole food nutrient solutions. We apply systems thinking to holistic nutrition that empowers practitioners to transform lives. Dedicated to the whole food philosophy of our founder, Dr. Royal Lee, our goal is to carry on his mission to provide nutrients for the body that are as close as possible to how they are found in nature.
I have a slightly bulging disc in my back that has been causing neuropathy in my left leg for years. I’ve had several rounds of trigger point injections; see a physical therapist regularly, and lately a chiropractor as well. The next step for me would be to try an epidural pain block. Several of my other doctors are big proponents of the “inflammation as a cause of disease” theory and have really encouraged me to do things to reduce inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids in particular help with this (as most Americans consume a poor ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 which can increase inflammation.) Hemp products contain phytocannabinoids, a substance that can help decrease pain and inflammation. This is full spectrum hemp oil derived from hemp seeds—meaning it contains all of the phytocannabinoids and not just one in particular. This is NOT CBD (cannabidiol) oil, although based on my research it likely contains low levels of CBD. CBD is the substance produced from hemp flowers (a plant with little to no THC—the substance that causes a high) (or marijuana flowers—a plant in the same family with significant THC) that is widely known to have medicinal purposes in pain relief, stopping seizures, etc.
There’s no definite amount that’s appropriate for everyone, but the ratio of CBD to THC will indicate how psychoactive the product is and if it’s legal in your state. The more CBD compared with THC, the less of a high, and vice versa. “Managing psychoactivity is key to successful cannabis therapy,” says Lee. “Amounts should be made clear on the label and lab-certified so people know what’s helping them and what’s not.”

One classic use is in soaps. Hemp oil is also used in paints and lubricants, and as a body care product. It may be rubbed directly onto the skin to treat cracked, dry skin, or it can be blended into body oils, body creams, and other personal care products. Some people also use it as a dietary supplement, taking advantage of the high concentrations of essential fatty acids in unrefined hemp oil and using the oil as a dressing or garnish to improve nutrition.


"The take-home message here," Lidicker writes, "is that many CBD oil companies are operating in a legal gray area, and this is made possible by the lack of specificity in the laws that govern and define hemp." At the end of the day, "CBD companies operating within currently accepted parameters are selling CBD products nationwide without significant interference. That could change in the future, but so far there has been no significant enforcement against consumers or vendors for selling CBD or hemp oil as long as it is nonintoxicating and made from a plant with less than .3 percent THC."

Hemp oil is an oil extracted from the hemp plant. All plants in the Cannabis genus can produce the oil, but usually only industrial hemp is used to make hemp oil. Industrial hemp is a hemp varietal which has been cultivated specifically for industrial production, and it has a minimum of the psychoactive substances associated with the genus, most notably THC. Hemp oil is typically almost free of THC, and it has no psychoactive properties.
In the United States, non-FDA approved CBD products are classified as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.[61] This means that production, distribution, and possession of non-FDA approved CBD products is illegal under federal law. In addition, in 2016 the Drug Enforcement Administration added "marijuana extracts" to the list of Schedule I drugs, which it defined as "an extract containing one or more cannabinoids that has been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis, other than the separated resin (whether crude or purified) obtained from the plant."[62] Previously, CBD had simply been considered "marijuana", which is a Schedule I drug.[61][63]

CBD interacts with the body through the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) or endocannabinoid system. First discovered in the late 1980’s, the endocannabinoid system regulates the body’s homeostasis, or general state of balance, impacting such functions as mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, and pain and immune response. Like an acrobat on a highwire, as the environment around us impacts our normal balance, the endocannabinoid system “corrects” by mediating our body’s reaction to keep us level.
There has been a lot of hype recently, especially throughout the media, regarding the rising-in-popularity CBD, but still plenty of confusion may exist regarding this naturally occurring chemical’s abilities, composition and why exactly it works. Probably the two most common topical forms of CBD are oils and creams, so these are the two products we will be focusing on.
In my healing journey with chronic pain and the autoimmune disorder Ankylosing Spondylitis (which I sometimes refer to as the gauntlet), I have tried a wide array of remedies. Painkillers, sleep-aids, herbs, and supplements for joint mobility, depression, anxiety, inflammation, muscle relaxation, more energy (because being in pain all the time is exhausting), adrenal fatigue, and mental clarity are all in the mix. One might call me a pharmaceutical and supplement connoisseur — or my own guinea pig. But “connoisseur” is a bit more poetic.
What makes these plants of interest to scientists, healers, and those in need of treatment is cannabidiol, or CBD. CBD is present in both hemp and marijuana, but what makes marijuana psychoactive — giving you the ‘high’ sensation — is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Hemp contains only trace amounts of THC, and studies have shown that CBD is not psychoactive like THC.
CBD oil differs from CBD creams, ointments and salves, for it is produced in a different way and also is typically consumed orally, or with the mouth through a dropper. The oils vary in potency, depending upon the source of extraction. Both industrial hemp and cannabis can be used to extract amounts of CBD in order for the oil to exist, but oils generated from industrial hemp tend to hold a lower potency, although this is not always the case.
Both hemp oil and marijuana oil have the potential to reduce stress, improve sleep, and relieve pain. However, hemp oil works more to improve general quality of life, while medicinal marijuana is often prescribed for specific ailments, such as reducing chronic pain or managing the side effects of chemotherapy. Hemp oil can help to reduce inflammation and relax the body without any of the psychoactive effects associated with marijuana, which makes hemp oil less intimidating and generally easier to start. Ultimately, both marijuana and hemp require further study to fully understand their potential benefits, their interactions in the human body, and the mechanisms of action involved.
Just what exactly does the ECS do? The ECS is the body’s primary regulatory system. It’s like an internal balancing mechanism, constantly keeping multiple body functions in a state of equilibrium. The body produces its own cannabinoids – endocannabinoids – that modulate these biological processes throughout the entire body. As such, endocannabinoids have a wide-ranging effect on everything from fertility to pain.
Nutiva began in 1999 as an idea in the mind of John W. Roulac, the author of four books on home composting and industrial hemp. Nutiva is the third successful business John has founded since jump-starting the modern home-composting movement in the early 1990s with his best-selling book, Backyard Composting. That book has sold more than a million copies worldwide.
Dry mouth: As is the case with many other hemp- and marijuana-based products, CBD oil often leads to a condition known as dry mouth (or cottonmouth). This is likely due to cannabinoids altering receptors in the lower jaw that trigger salivation. In most cases, mild discomfort and stronger-than-average thirst are the only issues associated with dry mouth.
Hemp oil or hempseed oil is obtained by pressing hemp seeds. Cold pressed, unrefined hemp oil is dark to clear light green in color, with a nutty flavour. The darker the color, the grassier the flavour. It should not be confused with hash oil, a tetrahydrocannabinol-containing oil made from the Cannabis flower, hailed by some[1] for its medicinal qualities.[2]
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