Mike, what kind of breast cancer (invasive ductal, I presume)? How many of her lymph nodes were positive? How big was the primary tumor? Reason I ask is that in women with Stage I or IIA tumors that are estrogen-and progesterone-receptor-positive and HER2-negative (ER+/PR+/HER2-) with three or fewer positive lymph nodes, there is a genomic assay test on a sample of the tumor, called OncotypeDX, that will tell doctors whether chemo is necessary or would even work at all. Medicare covers that test 100%.That type of breast cancer mentioned above, which I had as Stage IA, is treated in postmenopausal women with anti-estrogen drugs called aromatase inhibitors(aka AIs: anastrazole, letrozole, or exemestane)which have as a side effect joint pain. CBD oil is effective for this joint pain it is not, I repeat, NOT a substitute for chemo, radiation or these anti-estrogen drugs.So don’t assume your mom’s cancer will require chemo; but if it does, CBD helps with those side effects as well. If she lives in a state where medical marijuana is legal, there are doctors who sub-specialize in certifying applications for a medical marijuana card, and in the interim before the card is issued can advise as to the appropriate dose of CBD oil (legal and over-the-counter in all 50 states). Some (though not most) medical oncologists will certify their own patients’ medical marijuana card applications so she need not seek out another doctor; and will advise the appropriate dose for her symptoms. Once she gets her card, the “budtenders” in the licensed dispensaries can advise her as to the right CBD product (with or without THC), strength, and dosage. If she lives in a state where recreational weed is legal, the “budtenders” in the marijuana shops can steer her to the right strength of CBD oil and the right dosage.
CBD creams are produced with the extracted oils from cannabis or hemp infused into a topical base. They act upon the body’s naturally occurring CB2 receptors by binding with these components. The CB2 receptors are activated by either the body’s own, already present endocannabinoid system (ECS), or through the presence of phytocannabinoids, which are typically in the form of either CBD or THC.

Chronic pain leads to a feeling of despair and hopelessness. One wonders if the pain will ever end? Will I ever get my life back? An unexpected finding during our study was that our patients were coming back to us saying they were hopeful. Instead of their glass being half empty, it was now half full. Hope is powerful. When you have hope, your mind starts to work for you instead of against you. You start to imagine that things can be different. You find the motivation to get off the couch and get busy living instead of waiting to die. This feeling of hope inspired these patients to start engaging in activities we had encouraged them to do for years, like doing yoga, eating healthier, losing weight and moving more.

But, uh, what is it that CBD is supposed to do? I visited a cannabis dispensary in Boulder to find out what the hype was all about. After passing an ID check, I was introduced to a “budtender” who pointed me to an impressive array of CBD products — tinctures, skin patches, drink powders, candies, salves, massage oil, lotions, “sexy time personal intimacy oil” and even vaginal suppositories to treat menstrual cramps.
UNFORTUNATELY, WE ARE NOT ALLOWED TO TELL YOU! WE WISH WE COULD, NOT ONLY BECAUSE WE ARE INCREDIBLY PROUD OF OUR PRODUCTS, BUT ALSO BECAUSE WE GET EMAILS FROM PEOPLE ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY TELLING US HOW GREEN ROADS HAS MADE A DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES. HOWEVER, THE US FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION CURRENTLY PROHIBITS ALL MANUFACTURERS OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS FROM MAKING ANY CLAIMS ABOUT THE ABILITY OF THEIR PRODUCTS TO TREAT SPECIFIC HEALTH CONDITIONS. HEALTH CLAIMS ARE ONLY PERMITTED WHERE APPROVED BY THE FDA AND BASED ON ACCEPTED CLINICAL TRIALS. BECAUSE CBD IS RELATIVELY NEW TO THE MARKET, THE LENGTHY CLINICAL TRIAL PERIOD IS STILL IN PROCESS.
While research into the effects of CBD on specific conditions is important, a broader perspective on the relationship between CBD and the human body is necessary to understand how this unique compound works. Interestingly, many of the conditions that are supposedly helped by CBD have no well-understood cause, from acne to Alzheimer’s disease. However, one of the few common denominators between these conditions is the involvement of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in their causes.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, one of the major constituents of cannabis. CBD products are made from industrial hemp and come in various forms. Although hemp and cannabis are in the same plant species, CBD products now on the market contain less than 0.3 percent THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the cannabis compound that gets you high. CBD oil can be mixed into food, either straight or diluted with cooking oil, or it can be heated and its vapors inhaled. You can buy CBD in capsules, liquids, gummies, and sublingual sprays, and it is added to tea, coffee, and smoothies. Business experts estimate that the market for CBD products will reach more than $2 billion in consumer sales in the U.S. within the next four years.


Like most herbs, cannabis does have some antimicrobial and immune-boosting properties, but it is not as strong an antimicrobial as many other herbs. There are many better herbal choices for overcoming chronic Lyme disease and similar conditions related to chronic infections with stealth microbes such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. (Top ones include andrographis, berberine, cat’s claw, Japanese knotweed, sarsaparilla, and garlic.)

In the meantime, some physicians are forging ahead — and cashing in. Joe Cohen is a doctor at Holos Health, a medical marijuana clinic in Boulder. I asked him what CBD is good for, and he read me a long list of conditions: pain, inflammation, nausea, vomiting, intestinal cramping, anxiety, psychosis, muscle spasms, hyperactive immune systems, nervous system degeneration, elevated blood sugar and more. He also claimed that CBD has anti-cancer properties and can regenerate brain cells and reduce the brain’s levels of amyloid beta — a kind of protein that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. I asked for references, noting that most of these weren’t listed in the Academies report or a similar review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “I think you just have to Google search it,” he said. It’s true that a preliminary study found hints that cannabinoids might reduce beta amyloid proteins in human brain cells, but the study was done in cells grown in a lab, not in people. As for cancer, the FDA sent warning letters last year to four companies that were selling products that claimed to “prevent, diagnose, treat or cure” cancer.


The extract known as CBD oil sold in the U.S. falls into one of two categories. Crystalline isolate exclusively contains CBD, as other cannabinoids have been removed; full spectrum oil, on the other hand, retains THC and other cannabinoids, and is only sold in states where marijuana use has been legalized. CBD oil can be consumed several different ways, including ingested capsules and food products, vaporizing, tinctures, and topical creams. The soporific effects of CBD oil are linked to its concentration; low-concentration oils will produce minimal effects, while high-concentration oils will produce strong effects.
In this edition of Cannabis Conversations, Project CBD Director, Martin A. Lee, discusses the benefits of CBD, the "entourage effect" and the microbiome with Dr. Ethan Russo. A neurologist, scientist, and widely published author, Dr. Russo is currently the director of research and development at the International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute in Prague (www.icci.science).
While the cost of CBD oil products is presently high, it will likely come down dramatically after CBD and hemp are legal by federal standards — but prices will still vary widely. A high price for a CBD product does not always imply high quality, though a low price generally indicates you’re not getting enough CBD to see a benefit, so it’s important to know what to look for when buying or using a product.
My mother has dementia/Alzheimers along with a broken knee that they will not repair do to her mental status. She is currently in a nursing home. I firmly believe her mental situation began with the over use of hydrocodone for over 30 years and was acerbated by the trauma of breaking and disconnecting her knee cap. Since weaning her off of her meds (still in progress) we have regained much of her consciousness. I want to try CBD to help in her recovery or to help slow down the disease. I cannot find a dosage recommendation plus the nursing home/doctor does not recommend it. I would need to give it to her when I am there visiting (about 3 - 4 times per week). Is there a recommended dosage for dementia/Alzheimers?
And the products on the shelf aren't all the same, Ward said. "There can be many, many different varieties, and if you're thinking about doing this for medical reasons, you want to find a trusted source and do your research," she said. "Where does that oil come from, and how confident can you be that you know the exact percentages of the different cannabinoids in the product?"
As the PeaceHealth website suggests, hemp oil derives from a plant that contains high levels of the neurological chemical THC. This chemical can cause hallucinations, euphoria or high anxiety in supplement users when taken on a regular basis. As such, hemp oil supplements can cause similar effects in some patients using the herb for the treatment of any disorder. It is recommended that supplement users not take hemp oil products prior to operating machinery or driving due to the risk of these hallucinogenic properties. This is especially true to individuals who are overly-sensitive to THC, which can be determined by visiting your medical doctor for more information.
The hottest marijuana stock of 2018 might also take it on the chin. CV Sciences (NASDAQOTH:CVSI) has two diverse business segments, including specialty pharmaceuticals and consumer products. The consumer-products division features CBD oil used for beauty care, vaping, and specialty foods. It's possible CV Sciences could see some pushback in sales as a result of this CBD edible crackdown, although it's going to depend on whether more states begin banning CBD use in foods beyond New York, Ohio, and Maine. Coupled with the potential overhang of lawsuits concerning its specialty pharmaceutical division, CV Sciences might be a name to avoid.

Perhaps the most prevalent use for CBD is for pain management. The reality is that pain will affect everyone at some point in his or her life, and it’s comforting to know that there is a natural remedy that can help. The use of a natural remedy is especially important for those suffering from neuropathic pain and chronic pain – or pain that lasts for more than a few months. Chronic pain affects more than 3 million people in the United States every year – and the worst part? It can’t be cured. However, it can be treated and the irony is that in the United States, the most common medical treatments are nerve blocks, steroids, and narcotics (opioids) – many of which carry significant risk of side effects and addiction. Even over the counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Aspirin and ibuprofen are dangerous when used regularly – hospitalizing over 100,000 people each year and killing approximately 15,000. However, dangerous narcotics and NSAIDs are not your only option for pain relief! In addition to physical therapy and self-care, you can incorporate CBD into your treatment regimen for natural, plant-based pain relief. CBD is fundamentally different than most prescribed painkillers, as it’s not addictive, non-toxic, and has very minimal (if any) side effects.


Debate continues as to the existence of a clinically significant cannabis withdrawal syndrome with proponents (Budney et al 2004), and questioners (Smith 2002). While withdrawal effects have been reported in recreational cannabis smokers (Solowij et al 2002), 24 volunteers with MS who abruptly stopped Sativex after more than a year of continuous usage displayed no withdrawal symptoms meeting Budney’s criteria. While symptoms recurred after 7–10 days of abstinence from Sativex, prior levels of symptom control were readily re-established upon re-titration of the agent (Wade et al 2006).

CBD strains can be consumed just as you would THC strains. You can smoke or vaporize CBD-rich flower, eat a CBD-infused edible, swallow a CBD oil capsule, apply a CBD lotion, or use a CBD tincture sublingually. Hemp products also contain CBD, though it is a less efficient source and lacks the beneficial chemical diversity of cannabis-derived CBD products (more on that here).
Hemp oil or hempseed oil is obtained by pressing hemp seeds. Cold pressed, unrefined hemp oil is dark to clear light green in color, with a nutty flavour. The darker the color, the grassier the flavour. It should not be confused with hash oil, a tetrahydrocannabinol-containing oil made from the Cannabis flower, hailed by some[1] for its medicinal qualities.[2]

A condition in which a transplant attacks the body (Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)). Graft-versus-host disease is a complication that can occur after a bone marrow transplant. In people with this condition, donor cells attack the person's own cells. Early research shows that taking cannabidiol daily starting 7 days before bone marrow transplant and continuing for 30 days after transplant can extend the time it takes for a person to develop GVHD.


This one is far too large to be TSA-approved in your carry-on, but I don't really use this cannabis-infused body lotion for the loosening, relaxing sensation of CBD — it's not really a factor compared to the previous topicals. I use this because it's a damn good lotion. I bring it along in my checked bag to reinvigorate my dull, dehydrated post-flight skin when I start to unpack. 
CBD can be very pricey, and much of it is sold through multi-level marketing schemes, which I don’t like. Dosing isn’t precise (or well-explained); it would be very helpful to have informed guidance in this area. As it is, I break down any product I buy to cost-per-mg, and cost-per-serving, which helps, but I’m still not sure how much is too much or too little. I tell my husband to “listen to [his] body,” but that can be risky.
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