It is clear that CBD oil has a number of functions in pain relief and regulation. However, there are a few arguments that are worth considering. One is the use of CBD oil on children. Although proven to be a player in autism-symptom mitigation, the influence of CBD oil on the developing brain has yet to be deemed unintrusive. It is still not recommended that CBD be used extensively on children. The recommended dosage of CBD oil for children and adults, both, must be determined in consultation with a doctor.
Whether the chronic pain is in your back, neck, hands, feet, or elsewhere – CBD can help! In order to understand how CBD helps provide pain relief, we turn to a series of medical studies that have been conducted over the past ten years. These studies evaluated CBD’s medical efficacy in treating those who suffer from various types of pain. We will address the results below.
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In general, the human body has specific sites that are allotted to cannabinoids, called the cannabinoid receptor sites. Receptors are mechanisms to which the cannabinoids naturally present in the human body as well as the ones artificially ingested/ applied attach themselves. There are two kinds of receptors for cannabinoids, the CB1, and the CB2. While the CB1 receptors are present in the brain, the CB2 receptors can be found in the immune system.
Imagine not being able to sleep and becoming chronically sleep deprived. Imagine not being able to find a comfortable position to sit, stand or sleep. Imagine your significant other or children wanting your attention and you not having the capacity to give any. Imagine not being able to have enjoyable sex with the one you love. Experiencing chronic pain continuously changes you. It will make you crazy. Depression and anxiety are commonplace among this patient population.
Hemp Oil Complex™ is a combination of well-balanced polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, omega-3 oil) delivering essential fatty acids needed for the formation of specialized lipid mediators for a healthy immune response. Hemp oil and omega-3 oil may support the resolution phase of the inflammatory process by providing PUFAs which are known to be precursors to endocannabinoids. Additionally, Brassica (TrueBroc®) is an important phytonutrient providing antioxidant support by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathways.
I have a slightly bulging disc in my back that has been causing neuropathy in my left leg for years. I’ve had several rounds of trigger point injections; see a physical therapist regularly, and lately a chiropractor as well. The next step for me would be to try an epidural pain block. Several of my other doctors are big proponents of the “inflammation as a cause of disease” theory and have really encouraged me to do things to reduce inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids in particular help with this (as most Americans consume a poor ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 which can increase inflammation.) Hemp products contain phytocannabinoids, a substance that can help decrease pain and inflammation. This is full spectrum hemp oil derived from hemp seeds—meaning it contains all of the phytocannabinoids and not just one in particular. This is NOT CBD (cannabidiol) oil, although based on my research it likely contains low levels of CBD. CBD is the substance produced from hemp flowers (a plant with little to no THC—the substance that causes a high) (or marijuana flowers—a plant in the same family with significant THC) that is widely known to have medicinal purposes in pain relief, stopping seizures, etc.
Similarly, while Sativex and smoked cannabis have not been employed in the same clinical trial, comparisons of side effect profiles can be made on the basis of SAFEX studies of Sativex for over a year and up to several years in MS and other types of neuropathic pain (Russo 2006b; Wade et al 2006), and government-approved research programs employing standardized herbal cannabis from Canada for chronic pain (Lynch et al 2006) and the Netherlands for general conditions (Janse et al 2004; Gorter et al 2005) over a period of several months or more. As is evident in Figure 2 (Figure 2), all adverse events are more frequently reported with herbal cannabis, except for nausea and dizziness, both early and usually transiently reported with Sativex (see (Russo 2006b) for additional discussion).
Figure 2. Receptor Systems Involved in CBD’s Potential Therapeutic Applications. CBD interacts, either directly or indirectly, with many different receptor systems in the brain. It indirectly influences the major cannabinoid receptor in the brain by decreasing THC’s ability to stimulate this receptor. It also interacts with a variety of other receptors. A subset of these are shown here. Each red shape represents a different brain receptor that might be found on a neuron. Some of the potential therapeutic applications associated with CBD’s interaction with each receptor system are listed below each receptor.
Very few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been conducted using smoked cannabis (Campbell et al 2001) despite many anecdotal claims (Grinspoon and Bakalar 1997). One such study documented slight weight gain in HIV/AIDS subjects with no significant immunological sequelae (Abrams et al 2003). A recent brief trial of smoked cannabis (3.56% THC cigarettes 3 times daily) in HIV-associated neuropathy showed positive results on daily pain, hyperalgesia and 30% pain reduction (vs 15% in placebo) in 50 subjects over a treatment course of only 5 days (Abrams et al 2007) (Table 1). This short clinical trial also demonstrated prominent adverse events associated with intoxication. In Canada, 21 subjects with chronic pain sequentially smoked single inhalations of 25 mg of cannabis (0, 2.5, 6.0, 9.5% THC) via a pipe three times a day for 5 days to assess effects on pain (Ware et al 2007) with results the authors termed “modest”: no changes were observed in acute neuropathic pain scores, and a very low number of subjects noted 30% pain relief at the end of the study (Table 1). Even after political and legal considerations, it remains extremely unlikely that crude cannabis could ever be approved by the FDA as a prescription medicine as outlined in the FDA Botanical Guidance document (Food and Drug Administration 2004; Russo 2006b), due to a lack of rigorous standardization of the drug, an absence of Phase III clinical trials, and pulmonary sequelae (bronchial irritation and cough) associated with smoking (Tashkin 2005). Although cannabis vaporizers reduce potentially carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons, they have not been totally eliminated by this technology (Gieringer et al 2004; Hazekamp et al 2006).

The balm contains calendula and comfrey extracts to calm skin irritation, as well as the company’s proprietary CBD hemp oil, which is cold-pressed (more labor-intensive than the traditional extraction method) to maintain the maximum potency and nutrient value. In terms of effectiveness, this one is hard to match; the effect is immediate, and the absence of menthol or strong fragrances puts its power into sharper focus. 

People are turning to CBD oil to treat their pain more and more. Whether acute to chronic, pain can be located in different areas of the body and may be experienced at different intensities. This may call for different types of treatment that are more comprehensive than swallowing a prescription pill. CBD can be applied topically or consumed orally. Furthermore, CBD can be taken sublingually, smoked, eaten, or vaporized, depending on the product. In this way, CBD can treat pain very specifically. For some, a sore muscle on your lower back may feel better after using a CBD patch. For others, a headache might respond well to a CBD tincture. Pain is a universal feeling, but we respond differently and our bodies react in different ways depending on our overall health. The variety of ways in which CBD is consumed allows customers to pick a method based on their specific condition and their personal preference. For example, someone with sensitive lungs who doesn’t like smoking may prefer treating their pain with CBD capsules. Someone who takes a lot of pills, in general, may enjoy the experience of vaporizing. CBD is a naturally occurring chemical compound found in the cannabis and hemp plants. It does not produce the difficult side effects that those on prescription opioids commonly experience.

The glutamatergic system is integral to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and is responsible for generating secondary and tertiary hyperalgesia in migraine and fibromyalgia via NMDA mechanisms (Nicolodi et al 1998). Thus, it is important to note that cannabinoids presynaptically inhibit glutamate release (Shen et al 1996), THC produces 30%–40% reduction in NMDA responses, and THC is a neuroprotective antioxidant (Hampson et al 1998). Additionally, cannabinoids reduce hyperalgesia via inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide (Richardson et al 1998a). As for Substance P mechanisms, cannabinoids block capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia (Li et al 1999), and THC will do so at sub-psychoactive doses in experimental animals (Ko and Woods 1999). Among the noteworthy interactions with opiates and the endorphin/enkephalin system, THC has been shown to stimulate beta-endorphin production (Manzanares et al 1998), may allow opiate sparing in clinical application (Cichewicz et al 1999), prevents development of tolerance to and withdrawal from opiates (Cichewicz and Welch 2003), and rekindles opiate analgesia after a prior dosage has worn off (Cichewicz and McCarthy 2003). These are all promising attributes for an adjunctive agent in treatment of clinical chronic pain states.


Quality is a particular concern, because cannabis plants easily soak up heavy metals from pesticides and other contaminants, Marcu says. If you are buying online, look for a company that documents how it tests its products. (If the website doesn’t indicate this, call and ask.) “Buying from a reputable manufacturer is crucial, because it matters how the plant is cultivated and processed,” Dr. Maroon says. One clue that a company is cutting corners: too low a cost. Good CBD is pricey—a bottle of high-quality capsules is sold in Cohen’s office for $140. But for many, it’s worth the money. Roth spent $60 on her tiny bottle. But when her energy returned the day she started taking CBD, she decided that was a small price to pay.
Not all of America has access to medical cannabis yet, but the whole country has access to hemp-derived CBD. The eight pain clinics that I run in North Carolina have been recommending CBD to patients for a couple of years now and observing some incredible results. We continue to learn everyday what CBD can and can’t do for our patients in chronic pain.

Some CBD oil brands can be evasive when it comes to product testing details. Populum addresses this by including a hard copy of the oil’s lab testing results in the product packaging. Full lab results are easily accessible on the brand’s website, as well. Prices for the Populum CBD oil range from 18 to 24 cents per milligram, depending on the container size, making it a relatively inexpensive full spectrum product. All U.S. military veterans receive a 25% discount, as well. Populum offers a risk-free 30-night product trial.
Common adverse events (AE) of Sativex acutely in RCTs have included complaints of bad taste, oral stinging, dry mouth, dizziness, nausea or fatigue, but do not generally necessitate discontinuation, and prove less common over time. While there have been no head-to-head comparative RCTs of Sativex with other cannabinoid agents, certain contrasts can be drawn. Sativex (Rog et al 2005) and Marinol (Svendsen et al 2004) have both been examined in treatment of central neuropathic pain in MS, with comparable results (Table 1). However, adverse events were comparable or greater with Marinol than with Sativex employing THC dosages some 2.5 times higher due to the presence of accompanying CBD (Russo 2006b; Russo and Guy 2006).
For anybody with chronic pain, some forms of body contact can cause intense pain, which may lead some people to avoid being touched. If left unchecked, this can turn into a serious problem that affects your personal and social life. What makes CBD perfect for pain is that it works in the central nervous system to reduce intense feelings of pain and encourage more positive feelings through the release of certain chemical compounds and the workings of CB2 receptors. Once you start using CBD, you will be more receptive to touch, and this will be a positive thing.
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